Pukyong National University

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Warmest congratulations on your graduation

PKNU held a commencement ceremony in February 2024- 3,042 students graduated in the conference room at administration building on the 16th△ Graduates taking a commemorative photo at Haneoul garden. ⓒPhoto Lee Sung-Jae (PR team) Pukyong National University (President Jang Young-Soo) held a graduation ceremony in the conference room on the second floor of the administration building on the morning of February 16, with President Jang Young-Soo, Seo Young-Ok, president of the alumni association, national assembly members Park Soo-Young (Nam-gu, Gap) and Park Jae-Ho (Nam-gu, Eul), graduates, and parents attending in February 2024. The number of degree recipients at Pukyong National University in February 2024 is a total of 3,042, including 115 doctoral degrees, 427 master's degrees, and 2,500 bachelor's degrees. At the event, which was held online and offline, student Kim Hyeon-Seok (division of business administration) received the award from President for excellent academic performance, and Jeong Jae-Hee (division of environmental and marine sciences and technology) received the award from alumni association president. To commemorate the graduation ceremony and the 100th anniversary of the school's founding, Pukyong National University held a graduation celebration event and a 100 won coffee selling event, setting up photo zones for taking graduation photos throughout the campus so that graduates could leave memories. President Jang Young-Soo gave a speech at the graduation ceremony, saying, "With your graduation, this year is also a meaningful year that Pukyong National University leaves a significant mark, marking 100 years since its founding," he added, "I hope that you can use the deep footprints of older alumni as a steppingstone and move forward into the future, leaving clearer footprints." "Now, the world's economic, social, cultural, and political axes are rapidly moving to Asian countries, including Korea," he encouraged, "The future has already arrived and demands change and innovation. Remember, you can be anything and go anywhere." On this day, Seo Young-Ok, president of the alumni association said in a congratulatory speech, "We sincerely congratulate you on your graduation, the 220,000 alumni active around the world will be your strong supporters," she added, "Hope you keep in mind that you can be happy and live well not only when you are happy, but also when those around you are happy as well." △ The conference room at the administration building where the graduation ceremony held.△ President Jang Young-Soo and others entering prior to the event.△ Seo Young-Ok, president of the alumni association, giving a congratulatory speech.△ President Jang Young-Soo awarding president prize to a student with excellent grades.△ Seo Young-Ok, president of the alumni association is presenting the alumni president award to a student with excellent grades and taking a commemorative photo.△ President Jang Young-Soo posing for a commemorative photo after awarding degrees to representative graduates.△ Academic affairs committee members and guests who attended the graduation ceremony posing for a commemorative photo in front of the administration building after the ceremony.△ Participants in the graduation celebration event with Baekyong(ee) posing for a commemorative photo.△ Participants in the 100 won coffee event commemorating the school’s 100th anniversary.

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Successfully developed a high-performance composite membrane

Prof. Cho Kie-Yong's team at PKNU developed a high-performance composite membrane based on MOF- the results of joint research with the Korea institute of energy research published in an international academic journal△ The research team. (doctoral student Kwon Young-Je, master's student Bae Ji-Woo, and master's student Choi Kyeong-Min from the left in the front row, master's student Kaiyun Zhang and professor Cho Kie-Yong in the back row, from the left)  The research team led by professor Cho Kie-Yong (industrial chemical) at Pukyong National University succeeded in developing a high-performance composite membrane by intentionally inducing defects in UiO-66 nanoparticles, one of the metal organic frameworks (MOFs), and analyzing the impact of these defects on the manufacturing and performance of the composite membrane. Professor Cho Kie-Yong achieved results in this research through joint research with professor Kwon Hyuk-Taek chemical engineering), professor Son Min-Young and the research team led by doctor Yeo Jeong-Gu at the Korea institute of energy research. Metal-organic framework materials are porous, crystalline particles made by synthesizing metals and organic materials, allowing for various combinations, and due to its unique characteristics, such as high specific surface area, uniform pore size, and high adjustability, research is currently being actively conducted to utilize it in various fields such as catalysts, gas separation, and storage. However, because this material has low compatibility with polymer materials, it has the disadvantage of significantly reducing membrane stability and separation performance due to particle agglomeration. In addition, when manufacturing a thin composite film with this material, the shape stability was lowered depending on the separation driving conditions, so it was difficult to manufacture it in thin film form. To overcome this limitation, the research team developed a synthesis method that intentionally induces defects in UiO-66 particles by controlling the concentration of reactants such as reaction modulators and developed reaction conditions favorable for high-capacity synthesis while controlling the interfacial properties of particles in an easy and simple way, and developed a composite membrane that shows stable driving performance even in thin film-type separators. This defect induced in UiO-66 particles strengthened the interaction with the polymer, minimizing dispersibility problems, and increased the interaction with water, the separation target, significantly improving separation performance. The thin-film composite membrane manufactured by the research team using strong interactions caused by defects showed significantly higher separation performance, with the pervaporation index (PSI) improved by approximately 1,664% (16 times) compared to existing polymer membranes. Research member Choi Kyeong-Min, the first author of this research paper, said, "If defects in metal-organic framework materials can be intentionally adjusted or controlled, I expect that related industries will become larger and diverse by applying this material, which is used in various fields. We plan to conduct more active research on the development, utilization, and commercialization of new materials in the future." This research was supported by the National research foundation of Korea with the young researcher program, and the research paper 'Thin selective layered mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) with defective UiO-66 induced interface engineering toward highly enhanced pervaporation performance' was published in , an international academic journal in the field of chemical engineering (IF=15.1) on February 15th. △ The synthesis of defective MOFs and the impact of defects on the membrane and membrane performance. 

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Participates in joint research and development institutes with DGIST

PKNU-DGIST joins 'research team for bio-resources advancement on island wildlife- high expectations for the development of bio-resources from the island under the supervision of the Honam national institute of biological resources△ Professor Ryu Bo-Mi, the research director, Choi Seong-Gyun, the center director, and Jeong Jin-Woo, an official from the Honam national institute of biological resources (from the left). Pukyong National University (President Jang Young-Soo) and Daegu Gyeongbuk institute of science and technology (DGIST, president Lee Kun-Woo) announced that they participate as a joint research and development institution in the second detailed project of the 'multi-ministry bio-resources advancement project' hosted by the Honam national institute of biological resources (director Ryu Tae-Cheol) under the Ministry of environment. The goal of this project, supported by the Korea environmental industry and technology institute at the Ministry of environment, is to secure bio-resources on wild creatures living on the islands through cooperation between multiple ministries, including the Ministry of environment and the Ministry of science and ICT, and to discover academic value and industrial value through research on functionality. The Honam national institute of biological resources, which is in charge of the second detailed task of this project, 'identification of the origin of natural products (indicators/functional components) derived from island wildlife', has established a research team (director Choi Kyeong-Min) for the advancement on the bioresources from island since last year and has pursuing the project until 2026, Pukyong National University and DGIST have additionally joined since January of this year. With the participation of the two institutions, the research team expects to achieve a synergy effect in achieving the goals of securing the location of the second detailed project and producing useful information by collaborating with existing joint research and development institutions, Mokpo national university (securing information on island wildlife) and Jeju techno park biodiversity research institute (spirits and fractions). With the joining of this joint research and development institution, Pukyong National University plans to secure the production of extracts of materials, indicators, and single substances of functional ingredients secured through professor Ryu Bo-Mi (department of food and nutrition), and Daegu Gyeongbuk institute of science and technology plans to conduct production (spirits and fractions) and functional research (anti-cancer, etc.) on key information through ingredient analysis led by Choi Seong-Gyun, director of the Core protein resource center. Choi Kyeong-Min, head of the research team for the bio-resources advancement from island, said, "I believe that the participation of the two organizations this year will help improve the quantity and quality of research results and discover new projects, and I expect that research that can lead the bio industry using island wildlife materials will be actively conducted."

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Accredited for full 6 years in architectural education

PKNU accredited for full 6 years from KAAB architectural education accreditation- accredited 4 times in a row for architecture major, hosted by Korea architectural accrediting board△ A group photo of professors and students in architecture major. Pukyong National University announced that the department of architecture (head professor Oh Jang-Hwan) of the division of art and design has obtained '6-year full accreditation', the highest level of architectural education accreditation, from the Korea architectural accrediting board (KAAB). Architectural education accreditation is a system introduced for the international mutual recognition of architectural education. Currently, only architecture majors (or architecture departments) graduates from universities that have received architectural education accreditation can obtain an architect qualification. The major of architecture in Pukyong National University was the first among universities in the Busan-Gyeongnam region to obtain full architectural education accreditation in 2008, and has received the highest grade in the 4th accreditation following the 2nd and 3rd and will remain in effect until January 2030. Pukyong National University has once again received accreditation, acknowledging the excellence of a world-class five-year architectural education aimed at nurturing practice-oriented creative convergence talents who will lead the future architectural environment. It was highly evaluated in this accreditation program for its education on the major competencies required for architects, such as creative convergence, cooperation, and practical orientation, the high bond and cooperation between full-time professors and adjunct professors, mutual respect between professors and students, as well as the students' passion for education and active department club activities. Professor Kim Min-Seok in the major of architecture, who oversaw the accreditation process, said, "Architecture major faculty and students worked together to develop architectural education and enhance major competencies, and were able to achieve significant results with generous support from the university. In the future, we will do our best to train outstanding architectural experts who will be active at home and abroad through world-class architectural education programs."

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The brilliant idea 'one touch air splint' won the grand prize at the national competition

PKNU student developed a 'one-touch air splint' that can be worn in 15 seconds- Park Ye-Ji, Yoon Jeong-Won, Lee Ga-Ram won the 'grand prize' at the Lookie innovator day△ Lee Ga-Ram, Park Ye-Ji, and Yoon Jeong-Won. ⓒPhoto Lee Sung-Jae (PR team)Pukyong National University (President Jang Young-Soo) announced that the student team (advisor, professor Nam Seung-Yoon) of Park Ye-Ji (3-year student in Biomedical engineering), Yoon Jeong-Won (4-year student in polymer engineering), and Lee Ga-Ram (3-year student in industrial chemistry) developed a one-touch air splint that can be worn in 15 seconds. They won the grand prize at the Lookie innovator day, which was recently hosted by the SK Happiness foundation and held with the participation of university students from all over the country for their work 'S.O.S', a one-touch air splint using CO2 cartridges for emergency fracture patients. Unlike existing air splints, 'S.O.S' operates with one touch and can be used on multiple body parts, enabling a quick and reliable response in emergency situations. It was recognized by the evaluation panel as the best performance in this competition. This air splint, which is shaped like an air bladder, can be used for first aid when a sudden fracture or injury occurs during outdoor activities, but existing air splints require the use of a pump, so it takes several minutes to put them on and has the disadvantage of requiring various types of splints for each body part and being expensive because it relies on imports. 'S.O.S’, an air splint developed by students at Pukyong National University, connects a CO2 cartridge to the air inlet, presses the button, and the air sac inflates in 15 seconds to compress and fix the body part. It is designed to be customized to the human body and can be used in various parts. By applying customized materials, the volume has been reduced to increase portability, and at the same time, the price has been significantly lowered. Not only have they been tested on the public, but they are also working on commercializing air splints by applying for permission to use them as medical devices and pursuing collaboration with sports companies. Park Ye-Ji said, "I expect that the supply of S.O.S air splints to medically underserved areas will secure golden time for fracture treatment, spread a new sports culture that actively uses them for mountaineering and camping, where fracture injuries are frequent, replace essential items in emergency medical settings that minimize secondary damage to patients." △ Image demonstrating the use of the S.O.S air splint.

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Cancer treatment research using photothermal therapy attracts attention

Research on cancer treatment using photothermal therapy by a team led by Lee Song-Yi at PKNU gets attention- paper published in , a global review journal△ The research team. Prof. Lee Song-Yi, Kim Ga-Hyeon, Lee Seong-Man, Min Soo-Hong from the left. ⓒPhoto Lee Sung-Jae (PR team)    A research team led by professor Lee Song-Yi at Pukyong National University announced that research on the development and use of photothermal therapy for cancer treatment was published in (coord. chem. rev. / IF=20.6) of Elsevier, a world-renowned review journal in chemistry. The paper 'recent advances in organic photothermal agents for cancer treatment' by a research team consisting of professor Lee Song-Yi, lead author, doctoral student Lee Seong-Man (department of chemistry), and master's student Min Soo-Hong and Kim Ga-Hyeon (department of industry 4.0 convergence bionics engineering) at Pukyong National University was published in an international academic journal on the 3rd. In this review research, the research team focused on improving the targeting ability of photothermal agents, designing activatable molecular structures, and utilizing near-infrared-II light (NIR-II, 1000-1700 nm) to find solutions for using photothermal therapy for cancer treatment. Photothermal therapy for cancer treatment has developed rapidly in recent years with non-invasive treatment methods and effective treatment efficiency, but has several limitations that limit clinical application. Unlike previous studies on photothermal therapy that focused on nanomaterials and traditional photothermal contrast agents based on nanotechnology, the research team focused on the rational design of organic photothermal agents from 2018 to 2023, it is expected that they will be more widely used in clinical practice. A review journal is an academic journal that selects and re-explains topics of great academic value among existing research contents, and among these, 'coord. chem. rev.' is a world-class journal with a citation index of 20.6. It is a renowned academic journal that boasts the highest level of public trust and authority in the field of basic science, and presents guidelines for the research of numerous scientists in the same field. As for the research, the research team of Lee Song-Yi conducted with support from BK21 Four, young researcher program with the National research foundation, regional leading research center (RLRC), and the LAMP project.

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Development of a separator that improves Li-S battery efficiency

Prof. Cho Kie-Yong's team at PKNU proposed a separator for next-generation Li-S secondary batteries- paper in the international academic journal △ The research team. Prof. Cho Kie-Yong at Pukyong National University (center), Kwon Young-Je, Kim Se-Hoon, Choi Kyeong-Min (from left below), prof. Lee Jin-Hong from Pusan national university (top left) and Choi Seong-Wook. The research team led by professor Cho Kie-Yong at Pukyong National University (industrial chemistry) announced that they had developed a new separator for lithium-sulfur batteries, which are considered the next-generation secondary batteries. A joint research team led by professor Cho Kie-Yong at Pukyong National University and professor Lee Jin-Hong (department of organic material science and engineering) at Pusan national university proposed a manufacturing method based on metal-organic framework (MOF) materials to overcome the shuttle effect that causes degradation, a major obstacle to commercialization of Li-S batteries. The research team announced research results that improved the charging and discharging efficiency of Li-S batteries and the stability of electrodes by manufacturing and applying a separator based on a porous MOF material with a large surface area. Li-S batteries are attracting great attention as next-generation secondary batteries because they can achieve high electric capacity, but they have the problem of permanently reducing electrode capacity and shortening battery life by generating lithium polysulfate chains (Li2Sx) due to the shuttle effect during charging and discharging. The research team manufactured a separator using 'NZG', a composite of functionalized multifunctional MOF material (ZIF-8A) using zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8), one of the MOF materials, and graphene oxide, to overcome the shuttle effect and maintain high electrode capacity. As a result, the research team created a Li-S battery that maintains high electrode capacity even at fast charging and discharging rates through an immediate oxidation-reduction reaction through catalytic action in the NZG complex, which has an excessive number of amines on a large surface area of polysulfide generated during charging and discharging. The research was conducted with support from the National research foundation of Korea for young researcher program and the Ministry of trade, industry and energy, and was recently published in (IF=13.1, JCR=0.6%), an international academic journal in materials and energy. Kim Se-Hoon, a master's student and the first author of this research paper, said, "I expect that the commercialization of Li-S batteries, one of the next-generation battery types, can be accelerated by improving the problems of existing separators by developing multi-functional MOF materials and coating technology for Li-S batteries using composite technology."  

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Business and economics student team won the CFA Korea competition

PKNU, winner of the CFA Institute research challenge Korea competition- the team of Sung Chang-Wook, Kim Hee-Young, Jeong Woo-Jin, Kim Se-Woong, Han Seo-Joon qualified for asia-pacific championship△ The winners. Sung Chang-Wook, Han Seo-Joon, Kim Se-Woong, Jeong Woo-Jin, and Kim Hee-Young from the right. Pukyong National University (President Jang Young-Soo) announced that the team 'Challiance' from Pukyong National University won the finals of the '2023/24 CFA institute research challenge' of Korean competition. The winning team (advisory, prof. Lee Yoo-Kyeong in business administration, mentor, Kim Yeon-Kook from CFA) members are Sung Chang-Wook (1-year master's student in interdisciplinary program of public service and finance), Kim Hee-Young (1-year master's student in interdisciplinary program of public service and finance), Jeong Woo-Jin (3-year student in business administration), Kim Se-Woong (1-year student in business administration), and Han Seo-Joon (1-year student in business administration). They won the competition held at the SKY31 convention in Lotte world tower in Seoul on January 27th with the support of the DB Kim Jun-Ki cultural foundation, hosted by the CFA Korea association, and received a trophy and a CFA program scholarship. The 'CFA institute research challenge', known as the 'Olympics of investment analysis', is a global investment analysis presentation competition held for university (graduate) students around the world. The winners are determined by adding up the evaluation scores of the reports on the analyzed items and the presentation scores, and this entire process is taken in English. About 100 college (graduate) students in 23 teams from 17 universities participated in the Korean competition, which started in August last year and lasted for 6 months, and 6 teams including Pukyong National University, Kyunghee university, Dankook university, Seoul national university, Hanyang university, and Hongik university made it to the finals. In this competition, which analyzes presented industries and companies and provides buy (sell) recommendations to investors, they were recognized for their outstanding expertise in stock analysis, in-depth research, modeling, and corporate analysis, as well as their excellent English presentation skills. The student team from Pukyong National University, which won this year's Korean competition, will compete as Korea's representative in the asia-pacific (APAC) regional championship in March and compete against 26 teams. The top two teams that win this championship will compete against the top two teams from the Americas (AMERICAS) region and the Europe/Middle East/Africa (EMEA) region to determine the final winner. The global final competition is scheduled to be held in Warsaw, Poland in May this year. "To prepare for the preliminaries that started in August and the finals in January, we practiced as a team for more than 10 hours every day. Through this corporate analysis, I was able to utilize the general knowledge about management and finance that I had learned through undergraduate and master's courses, as well as acquire knowledge that could be applied to actual work by analyzing (valuing) the value of a company. At the same time, I believe that my increased understanding of management and the financial industry will be of great help in preparing for future employment," Kim Hee-Young gave her impressions on receiving the award. Kim Se-Woong said, "I was so worried at the first time because it was a new challenge to me, but I learned a lot during the preparation, led me to receive the award, I appreciate my team members and my professor supporting me. In the future, I would like to use this experience to work in planning, consulting, and IR positions." Jeong Woo-Jin and Han Seo-Joon also shared their impressions, "We think it's great that the process of running day and night to win the award has borne good results. We learned a lot from this competition, and based on this valuable experience, we would like to try out for a job in management support/IR or the financial sector."The CFA society Korea has been holding this competition every year since 2012, and past winning universities, in order of year, are Handong university, Sogang university (twice), Korea university (twice), Sungkyunkwan university (twice), Seoul national university, Hongik university (twice), and Dankook university.

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Joint research between PKNU and PNU attracting attention

PKNU and PNU joint research team have developed a high-performance silicon cathode battery- prof. Cho Kie-Yong and others applied the development of a cross-linked copolymer binder based on fluorine-based polymers- paper in the international academic journal △ The research team (professor Lee Jin-Hong at Pusan national university, master's student Kim Se-Hoon, professor Cho Kie-Yong and doctoral student Kwon Young-Je) The joint research team of professor Cho Kie-Yong (industrial chemistry) at Pukyong National University and professor Lee Jin-Hong (department of organic material science and engineering) from Pusan National University announced that they had developed a high-performance cathode battery using a cross-linked binder material based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF). The research team achieved this by developing a cross-linked copolymer binder based on PVDF, a fluorine-based polymer material in the form of a three-dimensional network used in silicon anode materials used in next-generation batteries such as secondary batteries. Graphite cathodes, the electrode material currently in use, have a low theoretical capacity, so silicon is being developed as a promising cathode material to manufacture electrodes for next-generation batteries with high capacity. However, silicon materials have the limitation of low commercial viability due to large volume changes during the charging and discharging process. To ensure the stability of the silicon cathode, binders using various materials such as polyvinyl alcohol and polyacrylic acid have been extensively studied, but the disadvantage is that the linear chains of the binder have low resistance to stress generated during volume expansion. To solve this problem, the research team succeeded in improving the stability of the silicon cathode and increasing electrode capacity and cycle life by applying a three-dimensional cross-linked network based on a fluorine-based polymer that has high electrochemical stability and is widely used in the manufacture of commercial electrodes. Doctoral student Kwon Young-Je, the first author of this research paper, said, "Cross-linkable copolymer binders based on fluorine-based polymers show improved rheological properties and better electrolyte affinity, and enable the stable and effective production of silicon anodes. At the same time, particle pulverization of the silicon anode can be alleviated to ensure the stability of the silicon anode." The research was conducted with support from the National research foundation of Korea for Young researchers program and the Ministry of trade, industry and energy, and the research results have been published in a paper titled 'a stress-adaptive interlinked 3D network binder for silicon anodes via tailored chemical bonds and conformation of functionalized poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) terpolymers' in the international academic journal (IF 15.1, JCR top 3.2%). △ The diagram and characteristic image of stable electrode actuation through PVDF-based cross-linkable copolymer binder. 

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Increased lifespan and safety of lithium metal batteries

A research team led by pro. Cho Kie-Yong at PKNU has developed technology to increase the lifespan and safety of lithium metal batteries- developed ultra-thin silica (SiO2) nanoparticle coating technology for battery separators- published in the international academic journal △ The research team (professor Yoon Jeong-Sik, Bae Ji-Woo, Kaiyun Zhang, Choi Kyeong-Min, Kwon Young-Je, Lee Min-Jeong from left top row, and Kim Se-Hoon, Cho Kie-Yong from the left bottom row) The research team led by professor Cho Kie-Yong (industrial chemistry) at Pukyong National University announced that they had succeeded in developing a separator coating technology that increases the lifespan and safety of lithium metal anodes used in lithium metal batteries, the next generation of batteries. The team, which includes professor Cho Kie-Yong at Pukyong National University, master's researcher Park Jae-Won, doctoral student Kwon Young-Je, and professor Yoon Jeong-Sik (department of energy and chemical engineering) from Incheon national university, developed an interface control technology for the separator that suppresses the formation of lithium dendrites in lithium metal cathodes. They succeeded in suppressing the formation of Li-dendrites, which threaten the safety of lithium metal batteries, by modifying the surface of a polypropylene separator using fluorine-based polymers and coating it with ultra-thin silica (SiO2, silicon dioxide) nanoparticles. Lithium metal cathode is attracting attention as a next-generation cathode that can realize the high capacity of lithium batteries. However, dendrites that occur on the surface of lithium metal not only cause rapid deterioration of lifespan, but also penetrate the separator and cause thermal runaway of the battery, which poses a risk of fire. Currently, related research on the suppression of lithium dendrites is actively underway, but in the case of inorganic particle coating using existing binders, there were problems such as uneven formation of the coating layer, difficulty in forming an ultra-thin film, and detachment of inorganic particles. Professor Cho Kie-Yong's team developed a method to coat silica nanoparticles very thinly and uniformly by controlling the interface of the separator based on fluorine-based polymers. The ultra-thin SiO2 nanoparticle coating layer developed by the research team this time is very thin (about 200 nm) and uniformly coated at high density. This makes the transport of lithium ions through the separator uniform, reducing overvoltage caused by a local lack of lithium ions, and it was shown that the growth of dendrite was suppressed. Coating with silica nanoparticles not only improved the mechanical properties, but also suppressed thermal shrinkage of the separator at high temperatures (140 °C), showing excellent high-temperature safety characteristics of the separator. Researcher Park Jae-Won, the first author of this research paper, explained, "I expect that by developing a high-performance separator for next-generation lithium metal batteries, we will be able to solve the safety problem, which is a major issue in secondary batteries, and contribute to accelerating the commercialization of lithium metal anodes." The research was supported by the support project for doctoral level researchers of the Ministry of trade, industry and energy and the National research foundation of Korea, and the paper containing the research results, 'ultra-thin SiO2 nanoparticle layered separators by a surface multi-functionalization strategy for Li-metal batteries: highly enhanced Li-dendrite resistance and thermal properties' was published on February 1 in the international academic journal (IF 20.4 / JCR top 2.95%). △ Diagram showing Li-dendrite suppression of Li-metal cathode through SiO2 nanoparticle coating.